As Ford marks Mustang’s 55th anniversary, enthusiasts everywhere are celebrating the world’s best-selling sports coupe for the fourth consecutive year.

From Australia to Peru, Mustang reigns as the best-selling sports coupe in the world for 2018, selling 113,066 cars, according to data from IHS Markit. 2018 not only marks the fourth straight year of Mustang’s global leadership as the world’s best-selling sports coupe, but also as the best-selling sports coupe in the United States, where Ford sold 75,842 Mustangs last year.

Ford sold 2,300 Mustangs in Europe in the first quarter of 2019, an increase of more than 27 per cent compared with the same period last year.*

“We broke the mould when Ford launched the Mustang 55 years ago,” said Jim Farley, Ford president, global markets. “Nothing says freedom, the wind in your hair and the joy of driving like Mustang; it’s an icon. The roar of its V8 on a spring day, there’s nothing better. No wonder it’s the most popular sports coupe in the world.”

Mustang was available for purchase in 146 countries in 2018, based on worldwide Ford sales data. More than 500,000 sixth-generation Mustangs have been sold worldwide since 2015, including more than 45,000 in Europe, with the pony picking up an additional half point of global share last year to capture 15.4 percent of the segment fuelled in part by the new Mustang Bullitt.

 

 

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*The Euro 20 markets are: Austria, Belgium, Britain, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Romania, Sweden and Switzerland.

Mustang CO2 emissions from 199 g/km, fuel-efficiency from 9.1 l/100 km

The declared fuel/energy consumptions, CO2 emissions and electric range are measured according to the technical requirements and specifications of the European Regulations (EC) 715/2007 and (EC) 692/2008 as last amended. Fuel consumption and CO2 emissions are specified for a vehicle variant and not for a single car. The applied standard test procedure enables comparison between different vehicle types and different manufacturers. In addition to the fuel-efficiency of a car, driving behaviour as well as other non-technical factors play a role in determining a car’s fuel/energy consumption, CO2emissions and electric range. CO2 is the main greenhouse gas responsible for global warming.

Since 1 September 2017, certain new vehicles are being type-approved using the World Harmonised Light Vehicle Test Procedure (WLTP) according to (EU) 2017/1151 as last amended, which is a new, more realistic test procedure for measuring fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. Since 1 September 2018 the WLTP has begun replacing the New European Drive Cycle (NEDC), which is the outgoing test procedure. During NEDC Phase-out, WLTP fuel consumption and CO2 emissions are being correlated back to NEDC. There will be some variance to the previous fuel economy and emissions as some elements of the tests have altered i.e., the same car might have different fuel consumption and CO2 emissions.